Kerosene

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Kerosene, a thin, clear liquid formed from hydrocarbons, with a density of 0.78–0.81 g/cm3, is obtained from the fractional distillation of petroleum between 150 °C and 275 °C, resulting in a mixture of carbon chains that typically contain between 6 and 16 carbon atoms per molecule.
Korosene properties:
Kerosene, a thin, clear liquid formed from hydrocarbons, with a density of 0.78–0.81 g/cm3, is obtained from the fractional distillation of petroleum between 150 °C and 275 °C, resulting in a mixture of carbon chains that typically contain between 6 and 16 carbon atoms per molecule. Regardless of the crude oil source or processing history, the major components of all kerosenes are branched and straight chain paraffins and naphthenes (cycloparaffins), which normally account for at least 70% by volume. Aromatic hydrocarbons in this boiling range, such as alkylbenzenes (single ring) and alkylnaphthalenes (double ring) do not normally exceed 25% by volume of kerosene streams. Olefins are usually not present at more than 5% by volume. The flash point of kerosene is between 37 and 65 °C (100 and 150 °F), and its autoignition temperature is 220 °C (428 °F). The pour point of kerosene depends on grade, with commercial aviation fuel standardized at −47 °C (−53 °F).
Fuel uses:
Heating and lighting: At one time, the fuel was widely used in kerosene lamps and lanterns.
Transportation: In the mid-20th century, kerosene or tractor vaporising oil (TVO) was used as a cheap fuel for tractorsIn the mid-20th century, kerosene or tractor vaporising oil (TVO) was used as a cheap fuel for tractors..